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Financing a Basic Income: Explorations of International Models for Application in Australia

  • Jennifer MaysEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Exploring the Basic Income Guarantee book series (BIG)

Abstract

Policy synergy centres on developing insight into the nature of the transformation in social protection, the extent of redistribution, the character of the tax system and the pattern of work incentives. There is a synergistic relationship between redistribution and changing the nature of the taxation revenue system, to ensure the rights of all are being met. The examination contributes to stronger arguments for financing a basic income through reclaiming natural resources royalties (cost, distributional impact and feasibility) and nationalized mining. The use of international examples such as in Alaska is one way forward to reshape the Australian political economy. There is a brief excursion into sustainability debates of basic income and ecological perspective for a socially just society and greener economy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kelvin Grove CampusQueensland University of TechnologyKelvin GroveAustralia

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