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Basic Income in Australia and Disability Conceptions

  • Jennifer MaysEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Exploring the Basic Income Guarantee book series (BIG)

Abstract

In this chapter, the idea of a basic income is considered alongside the key principles relevant to basic income. The chapter explores some of the challenges associated with different basic income models and details the way it would be beneficial for people with disability. The critical theme of the chapter is envisaging an ideal basic income for Australia, especially given the range of competing claims. The discussion is positioned in relation to the disability dimension to understand implications of basic income relative to people with disability and inclusive, socially just policy. The insights contribute to clearer conceptions about the connections to existing social security measures and the necessity of reconfiguring basic income and how it would be beneficial for people with disabilities.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kelvin Grove CampusQueensland University of TechnologyKelvin GroveAustralia

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