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Regional-Scale Ecological Risk Assessment of Mercury in the Everglades and South Florida

  • Darren G. RumboldEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to provide information to resource managers about current ecological risk from mercury exposure to fish and wildlife in the Everglades and the wider south Florida environment. The chapter begins with an overview of the history of previous ecological risk assessments in south Florida. Next, methods to assess toxicological effects and the difficulties in assessing exposure to fish and wildlife across this varied landscape are reviewed. Risks to south Florida wildlife are then characterized based on multiple lines of evidence for a variety of ecological receptors. The chapter closes with a discussion of potential future risk following the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

Keywords

Ecological risk Toxicity Fish Wildlife Mercury 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Florida Gulf Coast UniversityFort MyersUSA

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