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Case Studies of Global Governance for Health Research

  • Kiarash Aramesh
Chapter
Part of the Advancing Global Bioethics book series (AGBIO, volume 15)

Abstract

This chapter is specified to a number of case studies to portray the challenges of Global Health Governance and Global Governance for Health Research in the real-world through historical cases. The fourth chapter begins with a broader scope. In the first case, Zika pandemic, it shows how Global Health Governance uses previous experiences to deal with newly-emerged pandemics. Research integrity in Iran discusses how local practices on research integrity are important at the global scale and should be addressed by Global Governance for Health Research. HIV/AIDS Research in LMICs describes a paradigm case of exploitation in research that contributed to a significant shift in the history of clinical research. Sending Biological Specimens Abroad discusses bio-piracy as a topic within Global Governance for Health Research. Also, it shows how international collaborations may be seen by the weaker sides. Research on Pre-Implantation Human Embryo portrays how different religious and seculars perspectives collectively take part in shaping the ethical grounds for Global Governance for Health Research. The final case study in this chapter, Traditional Medicines, Science-Pseudoscience Debate, and Biopiracy, addresses the globalized aspects of science-pseudoscience debate and Biopiracy by discussing traditional medicines as a paradigm example. By exploring such spectrum of real-world cases, the fourth chapter portrays the existing need of Global Health Governance and Global Governance for Health Research to a comprehensive ethical framework. It also shows how particular challenges or ethical principles are more relevant to each case.

Keywords

Zika pandemic Research integrity HIV/AIDS research Bio-piracy Pre-implantation human embryo Traditional medicine Science-pseudoscience debate Biopolitics 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiarash Aramesh
    • 1
  1. 1.Edinboro University of PennsylvaniaEdinboroUSA

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