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Lung Cancer: Clinical Findings, Pathology, and Exposure Assessment

  • Elizabeth N. PavliskoEmail author
  • Victor L. Roggli
Chapter
  • 43 Downloads

Abstract

Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and the most common cause of a cancer-related death. Tobacco smoking is the most important cause of lung cancer in most populations although occupational exposures cause an increased risk of lung cancer more than any other malignancy. This chapter will review the histomorphology and classification of carcinoma of the lung and the evidence for specific occupational exposures reported to cause lung cancer.

Keywords

Occupational lung cancer Epidemiology Asbestos Pulmonary asbestos analysis Arsenic Silica Chromium Nickel Polyaromatic hydrocarbons 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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