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Marvel’s Agent Carter: [Peggy Punches Him in the Face]

  • Cat Mahoney
Chapter

Abstract

In discussing Agent Carter, this chapter will explore the ways in which the series’ historical setting, as well as its location within the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), facilitates its apparently ‘feminist’ tone. It will demonstrate that Agent Carter’s construction of a pleasurable yet politically empty version of second wave feminism simultaneously affirms feminist discourses and yet undermines their political goals. Drawing on scholarship around female spies, female action heroes and postfeminist gender identities, it will discuss the depiction of Peggy Carter as a viable feminist hero, yet one whose narrative depiction is constrained by the ideological and aesthetic ideals of postfeminism.

Keywords

Captain America Marvel Cinematic Universe MCU Postfeminism Female spies Female action heroes Peggy Carter 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cat Mahoney
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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