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Finding a Feminine Space in Female Ensemble Drama: Postfeminist Visions of Female Liberation in Land Girls

  • Cat Mahoney
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter will examine the representation of the Women’s Land Army (WLA) in the BBC series Land Girls (2009–2011). It will discuss the drama in the context of the postfeminist media climate in which it was created and as an example of female ensemble drama (FED). Thinking about the potential of FED, it will explore the concept of women’s history on television and the possibilities created when male characters are de-centred. It will consider the ways in which Land Girls utilises its affiliation with ‘women’s genres’ to generate realism that is not reliant on historical accuracy. Through this affiliation postfeminist norms are dehistoricised and woven into the cultural mythology and memory of the Second World War.

Keywords

Women’s Land Army Land girls Female ensemble drama FED Postfeminism Melodrama Women’s genres 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cat Mahoney
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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