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Overview of Infectious Diseases of Concern to Dental Practitioners: Bacterial Infections

  • Lisa D’AffronteEmail author
  • Christina L. Platia
Chapter

Abstract

Bacterial infections are a rising concern in the hospital setting. These infections are caused by what are aptly named “ESCAPE” pathogens because they are not responsive to traditional antibiotics. Of particular concern is the rise of MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staph aureus) and VRE (Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci). Although these bacterial infections are not something that the dental provider would likely encounter, it is important that we follow appropriate antibiotic prescribing protocol as to not contribute to the global problem of antibiotic resistance. Sexually transmitted diseases, particularly syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia are still very common bacterial infections in the United States. It is important that health-care providers recognize any signs and symptoms, so that appropriate diagnosis and treatment can occur. These STDs are all treatable with the use of appropriate antibiotics.

Keywords

Escape pathogens MRSA VRE Antibiotic resistance Sexually transmitted diseases Syphilis Gonorrhea Chlamydia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of General DentistrySchool of Dentistry, University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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