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Sexual Dysfunction in Suprapontine Lesions

  • David B. VodušekEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Urodynamics, Neurourology and Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions book series (UNPFD)

Abstract

Neurologic disease may affect the sexual function by the neural lesion itself, or by its treatment; but also because of disease-related sensorimotor, bladder, bowel, and cognitive dysfunction; and, finally, because of issues related to psychosocial and cultural changes resulting from the chronic disease. Hypersexuality or loss of sexual desire, erectile and ejaculatory dysfunction in men, decreased lubrication in women, and disturbances of orgasm are more common in neurological patients than the general population, but are often not communicated to their doctor. Sexual symptoms may be relevant for the diagnosis, significantly affect quality of life of both the patient and the partner, and may be responsive to treatment.

Keywords

Sexuality Neurological disease Erectile dysfunction Premature ejaculation Lubrication Orgasmic dysfunction Hypersexuality 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Neurology, Institute for Clinical NeurophysiologyUniversity Medical Centre LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia

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