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A Blockchain Based Framework for Blood Distribution

  • Mehmet Çağlıyangil
  • Sabri ErdemEmail author
  • Güzin Özdağoğlu
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Abstract

Today’s businesses have been evolving along with the technological developments, such as Industry 4.0, internet of things, and blockchain technology, in order to create not only fully digital and traceable but also transparent, reliable and secured environments. Blockchain technology serves for developing the transparency, reliability, and security characteristics of these environments even if it is frequently mentioned along with the monetary systems such as Bitcoin. The most common purposes to adopt the blockchain technology is to redesign and integrate processes, supply chains or financial arrangements. This chapter proposes such an Ethereum blockchain based framework called KanCoin concerning this potential in order to manage and adjust the processes for efficient distribution planning in blood delivery system from donors to distribution centers and patients at medical centers in a more effective way than the conventional procedures.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mehmet Çağlıyangil
    • 1
  • Sabri Erdem
    • 1
    Email author
  • Güzin Özdağoğlu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Business Administration, Faculty of BusinessDokuz Eylül UniversityBucaTurkey

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