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Anatomical, Regional, Targeted (ART) Botulinum Toxin Injection for Migraine and Chronic Headaches

  • Bardia AmirlakEmail author
  • Michael Chung
Chapter

Abstract

The anatomical, regional, and targeted (ART) Botox injection paradigm for migraine improves upon traditional injection patterns and is based on the theory that Botox acts directly on peripheral pain receptors. Rather than a shotgun approach, the ART technique is targeted and relies on accurate anatomy of known trigger points. Only regions that are involved with headache perception are injected and not necessarily all the tender areas.

Keywords

Migraine Headache Botulinum toxin Botox Anatomical Regional Targeted 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDallasUSA

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