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Jaw Surgery Simulation in Virtual Reality for Medical Training

  • Krit Khwanngern
  • Narathip TiangtaeEmail author
  • Juggapong Natwichai
  • Aunnop Kattiyanet
  • Vivatchai Kaveeta
  • Suriya Sitthikham
  • Kamolchanok Kammabut
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1036)

Abstract

The cutting of the lower jaw bone is an important surgical operation in the treatment of craniofacial disorders. However, many of the craniofacial disorders are rare occurrences. As a result, many medical students may never have hands-on experience on the cutting process. They rely on recorded materials such as books and videos which are not reliable skills transferring methods. In this work, we developed a virtual reality application for simulating the mandibular bone surgery. The system allows visualization of an operation room in a highly realistic virtual reality environment. Multiple operation modes are available and the user can use motion controllers to grip, cut, drill, join and compare the 3D model of the skull. For the cutting and drilling process, the guidelines for optimal cutting path are shown on a virtual model. The progress of the operation is evaluated and displayed as percentage numbers on user interface. The system continuously tracks the cutting line and announces the failure when the error rate is more than 10%. Our proposed system was evaluated by specialists in the field. In general, they provided positive feedback with some improvement suggestions for future works.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Krit Khwanngern
    • 1
    • 2
  • Narathip Tiangtae
    • 3
    Email author
  • Juggapong Natwichai
    • 3
  • Aunnop Kattiyanet
    • 3
  • Vivatchai Kaveeta
    • 1
    • 2
  • Suriya Sitthikham
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kamolchanok Kammabut
    • 1
  1. 1.CMU Craniofacial Center, Faculty of MedicineChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand
  2. 2.Center of Data Analytics and Knowledge Synthesis for HealthcareChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand
  3. 3.Department of Computer Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand

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