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Ignorance

  • Katharina GerundEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This entry discusses the notion of “ignorance” as it circulates in popular parlance and academic discourse. It summarizes the main strands of scholarship on the concept and shows how ignorance has developed from a largely neglected issue to a valid topic in its own right in various disciplines. Ignorance emerges as a contested and complex term that is often situated within different political projects and sometimes even conflicting ideological agendas.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany

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