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Augmenting Learning of Design Teamwork Using Immersive Virtual Reality

  • Neeraj SonalkarEmail author
  • Ade Mabogunje
  • Mark Miller
  • Jeremy Bailenson
  • Larry Leifer
Chapter
Part of the Understanding Innovation book series (UNDINNO)

Abstract

When it is done well, design teamwork is a fun, creative, and productive activity. However, the learning of effective design teamwork is hampered by lack of exposure to variation in design contexts, lack of deliberate practice and lack of appropriate feedback channels. In this chapter we present immersive Virtual Reality (VR) in accompaniment to action-reflection pedagogy as a solution to augmenting design team learning. A prospective case of using VR to augment design teamwork practice is discussed and a research agenda is outlined towards understanding VR as a medium for design teamwork, investigating its influence on design team self-efficacy and implementing it in design education courses.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neeraj Sonalkar
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ade Mabogunje
    • 1
  • Mark Miller
    • 2
  • Jeremy Bailenson
    • 2
  • Larry Leifer
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Design ResearchStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Virtual Human Interaction LabStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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