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Gastric Bypass pp 125-132 | Cite as

Systemic Inflammation in the Morbidly Obese Patient

  • Antonio Jamel Coelho
Chapter
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Abstract

Obesity is a global disease which prevalence is rapidly increasing, achieving epidemic proportions. Many obese patients, BMI equal to 30 kg/m2, apparently do not present signs or symptoms of obesity-related diseases. However, excess weight slowly causes changes in several organs and systems that may cause respiratory and circulatory disorders and arthropathies, among others, leading to a decrease in patients’ quality of life.

As the adipose tissue and adipocyte studies progressed, the endocrine functions of these structures became evident, highlighting the important function of adipose tissue macrophages, although they are not the only cause of inflammatory response. The release of cytokines and adipocytokines, mainly by adipocytes within the adipose tissue damaged, leads to metabolic alterations that cause a chronic inflammatory state, evidenced by acute phase inflammatory markers. As a result of these molecular modifications, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance can occur which can trigger the development of metabolic syndrome.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio Jamel Coelho
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EmergencyHospital Barra D’OrRio de JaneiroBrazil

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