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Masculine Discourses in r/gaming

  • Marcus MaloneyEmail author
  • Steven Roberts
  • Timothy Graham
Chapter

Abstract

What follows in this chapter is a qualitative analysis of masculine gendered commentary on r/gaming. The chapter is organised into two substantive sections in which we discuss the two overarching categories that emerged during the coding process. This is then followed by a broader summary and some tentative concluding thoughts. Power dynamics emerge as a central part of masculine gendered discourse on r/gaming, but they offer only one part of a broader story in which softer, more egalitarian tendencies are also apparent.

Keywords

Masculinity Homosocial Hegemonic masculinity Inclusive masculinity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcus Maloney
    • 1
    Email author
  • Steven Roberts
    • 2
  • Timothy Graham
    • 3
  1. 1.School of HumanitiesCoventry UniversityCoventryUK
  2. 2.School of Social SciencesMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia
  3. 3.Queensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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