Advertisement

The Political Economy of Southeast Asia’s Extractive Industries: Governance, Power Struggles and Development Outcomes

  • Pascale HatcherEmail author
Chapter
  • 37 Downloads
Part of the Studies in the Political Economy of Public Policy book series (PEPP)

Abstract

Building on insights from the Murdoch School, this chapter provides an analysis of the political economy of extractive industries in Southeast Asia, emphasising how multi-scalar politics have shaped specific modes of governance in the sector, and in turn, regional development outcomes. It provides an overview of the region’s extractive industries’ production, exploring how domestic and international power struggles have influenced modes of governance in the sector and the socio-environmental ramifications of this. It also analyses the emerging contestation of the neoliberal norms forged by pro-extractive industry interests.

Keywords

Extractive industries Mining Hydrocarbons Governance Environment Civil society 

References

  1. ADB [Asian Development Bank]. (2007). Philippines: Critical development constraints. Manila: Asian Development Bank.Google Scholar
  2. ASEAN. (2016). ASEAN Minerals Cooperation Action Plan 2016–2025 (AMCAP-III): Phase (2016–2020). Jakarta: ASEAN Secretariat.Google Scholar
  3. Balaton-Chrimes, S., & Macdonald, K. (2016). The compliance advisor ombudsman for the IFC/MIGA: Evaluating potential for human rights remedy (Non-judicial redress mechanisms report series 17). http://corporateaccountabilityresearch.net/njm-report-xvii-cao. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  4. Bebbington, A., Hinojosa, J., Bebbington, D., Burneo, M. L., & Warnaars, X. (2008). Contention and ambiguity: Mining and the possibilities of development. Development and Change, 39(6), 887–914.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Belem, G. (2009). Mining, poverty reduction, the protection of the environment and the role of the World Bank Group in Mali. In B. Campbell (Ed.), Mining in Africa: Regulation and development (pp. 119–149). New York: Pluto Press.Google Scholar
  6. Bello, W., Docena, H., de Guzman, M., & Maliq, M. L. (2004). The anti-development state: The political economy of permanent crisis in the Philippines. London: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  7. BIC [Bank Information Centre], Bretton Woods Project, Earthworks, Oxfam International, & Campagna per la Riform della Banca Mondiale. (2006). The World Bank Group’s gold mining operations. Tarnished gold: Mining and the unmet promise of development. www.bicusa.org/proxy/Document.9518.aspx. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  8. Campbell, B. (Ed.). (2004). Regulating mining in Africa: For whose benefit? (Discussion paper no. 26). Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet.Google Scholar
  9. Campbell, B. (Ed.). (2009). Mining in Africa. Regulation and development. London/Ottawa/Uppsala: Pluto/IDRC/Nordiska Afrikainstitutet.Google Scholar
  10. Campbell, B. (Ed.). (2013). Modes of governance and revenue flows in African mining. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  11. Campbell, B., & Laforce, M. (2016). La responsabilité sociale des entreprises dans le secteur minier [Corporate social responsibility in the mining sector]. Montreal: Presses de l’Universite du Quebec.Google Scholar
  12. Carroll, T. (2010). Delusions of development: The World Bank and the post-Washington consensus in Southeast Asia. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Cornish, G., & Vivoda, V. (2016). Myanmar’s extractive industries: An institutional and regulatory assessment. The Extractive Industries and Society, 3, 1075–1083.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Coumans, C. (2011). Whose development? Mining, local resistance, and development agendas. In J. Sagebien & N. M. Lindsay (Eds.), Governance ecosystems: CSR in the Latin American mining sector (pp. 114–132). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Dashwood, H. S. (2013). Sustainable development and industry self-regulation. Business & Society, 53(4), 551–582.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Doyle, C., Wicks, C., & Nally, F. (2006). Mining in the Philippines: Concerns and conflicts. Report of a fact-finding trip to the Philippines. Knowle: Society of St. Columban.Google Scholar
  17. EIR [Extractive Industries Review]. (2003). Striking a better balance. Vol 1: The World Bank and the extractive industries. The final report of the extractive industries review. Washington, DC: World Bank Group.Google Scholar
  18. EITI [Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative]. (2018). Indonesia. Extractive industries transparency initiative. https://eiti.org/indonesia. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  19. Gagné-Ouellet, S. (2012). Regulatory framework revision and mining regime reform in Mali: Degrees of rupture and continuity. In B. Campbell (Ed.), Modes of governance and revenue flows in African mining (pp. 47–100). London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  20. Gellert, P. K. (2010). Extractive regimes: Toward a better understanding of Indonesian development. Rural Sociology, 75(1), 28–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Gill, S. (1995). Globalisation, market civilisation, and disciplinary neoliberalism. Millennium: Journal of International Studies, 24(3), 399–423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Hatcher, P. (2014). Regimes of risk: The World Bank and the transformation of mining in Asia. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  23. Hatcher, P. (2016). Le boom minier de la Mongolie et la montée du nationalisme des ressources: Tensions politiques, promesses électorales et normes néolibérales [The Mongolian mining boom and the rise of resource nationalism: Political tensions, electoral promises and neoliberal norms]. Canadian Journal of Development Studies, 37(4), 466–483.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Holden, W. N. (2005). Civil society opposition to nonferrous metals mining in the Philippines. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 16(3), 223–249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Human Rights Watch. (2016, February 10). Human rights shouldn’t be sidelined at ASEAN summit. https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/02/10/human-rights-shouldnt-be-sidelined-asean-summit. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  26. IBRD, & IFC [International Bank of Reconstruction and Development & International Finance Corporation]. (1999). Philippines: Country assistance strategy. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  27. ICMM. (2017). ICMM 10 principles. International council on mining and metals. https://www.icmm.com/en-gb/about-us/member-commitments/icmm-10-principles. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  28. IGF. (2017). Global trends in artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM): A review of key numbers and issues. Intergovernmental forum on mining, minerals, metals and sustainable development. Winnipeg: IISD.Google Scholar
  29. Jayasuriya, K. (2003). Civil society, regulatory state and the new anti-politics. Murdoch: Asia Research Centre, Murdoch University.Google Scholar
  30. Kemp, D., & Owen, R. (2017). Grievance handling at a foreign-owned mine in Southeast Asia. The Extractive Industries and Society, 4(1), 131–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Leith, D. (2002). Freeport and the Suharto regime, 1965–1998. The Contemporary Pacific, 14(1), 69–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Munthe, B. C., & Jensen, F. (2018, May 24). Distraction or disaster? Freeport’s giant Indonesian mine haunted by audit report. Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-indonesia-freeport-environment-analys/distraction-or-disaster-freeports-giant-indonesian-mine-haunted-by-audit-report-idUSKCN1IP1H5. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  33. Naito, K., Otto, J., & Eggert, R. G. (1998) Mineral investment risk and opportunities in Asia. Resources Policy, 24(2), 77–78.Google Scholar
  34. Nettleton, G., Whitmore, A., & Glennie, J. (2004). Breaking promises, making profits: Mining in the Philippines. London: Christian Aid and Philippine Indigenous Peoples Links.Google Scholar
  35. Robison, R. (2009). Indonesia: The rise of capital. Reprint. Singapore: Equinox Publishing.Google Scholar
  36. SAPRIN. (2001). The impact of investment liberalization and the Mining Act of 1995 on indigenous peoples, upland communities and the rural poor, and on the environment: A summary report. Manila: Structural Adjustment Participatory Review International Network.Google Scholar
  37. Szablowski, D. (2007). Transnational law and local struggles: Mining, communities and the World Bank. Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  38. Taylor, N. A. J. (2011, October 19). West Papua: A history of exploitation. Al Jazeera. https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2011/08/201182814172453998.html. Accessed 14 Mar 2019.
  39. USGS [United States Geological Survey]. (1996). The mineral industries of Asia and the Pacific. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  40. USGS. (1997). The mineral industries of Asia and the Pacific. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  41. USGS. (2012). 2010 minerals yearbook: Asia and the Pacific. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information. https://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/asia.html. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  42. USGS. (2016). 2013 minerals yearbook: Asia and the Pacific. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  43. USGS. (2017). 2014 minerals yearbook: Asia and the Pacific. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  44. USGS. (2018a). 2015 minerals yearbook: Philippines (advance release). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  45. USGS. (2018b). 2015 minerals yearbook: Malaysia (advance release). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  46. USGS. (2018c). 2015 minerals yearbook: Timor-Leste (advance release). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  47. USGS. (2018d). 2015 minerals yearbook: Thailand (advance release). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  48. USGS. (2018e). 2015 minerals yearbook: Vietnam (advance release). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey-Minerals Information.Google Scholar
  49. Venzon, C. (2018, August 25). Flare-up of resource nationalism burns miners across Asia. Nikkei Asian Review. https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Markets/Commodities/Flare-up-of-resource-nationalism-burns-miners-across-Asia. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  50. Watts, J. (2018, February 2). Almost four environmental defenders a week killed in 2017. The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/feb/02/almost-four-environmental-defenders-a-week-killed-in-2017. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  51. Wilson, J. D. (2017). International resource politics in the Asia-Pacific: The political economy of conflict and cooperation. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. World Bank. (2005). Extractive industries and sustainable development: An evaluation of World Bank Group experience. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  53. World Bank. (2012). The World Bank Group in extractive industries: 2012 annual review. Washington, DC: World Bank.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. World Bank. (2013). Mining: Sector results profile. http://www.worldbank.org/en/results/2013/04/14/mining-results-profile. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  55. World Bank Data. (2019a). The Philippines: Total debt service (% of GNI). https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/DT.TDS.DECT.GN.ZS?locations=PH. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  56. World Bank Data. (2019b). Total natural resources rents (% of GDP). https://data.worldbank.org/topic/energy-and-mining?contextual=region&end=2016&locations=4E&start=1975. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.
  57. World Energy Council. (2016). Southeast Asia and the Pacific. https://www.worldenergy.org/data/resources/region/southeast-asia-pacific/oil/. Accessed 7 Feb 2019.

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political Science and International RelationsUniversity of CanterburyChristchurchNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations