Advertisement

Silence, the Impossible Object

  • Ed Pluth
  • Cindy Zeiher
Chapter
Part of the The Palgrave Lacan Series book series (PALS)

Abstract

In this chapter, we contrast a Lacanian approach to silence and language with another historically significant approach to the topics, studied and presented in detail by William Franke in a series of books, which we call apophatic discourse. We determine that the silence portrayed in this discourse is an imaginarized, impossible object, and we discuss how it manifests in some clinical cases Lacan discussed (Dora and the Papin sisters) as well as in his formulas for sexuation.

Keywords

Lacan Hegel Kojève Silence Language Negation Apophatic discourse Franke (William) The Papin sisters 

References

  1. Beckett, S. (1954 [1982]). Waiting for Godot: A Tragedy in Two Acts. New York: Grove Press.Google Scholar
  2. Dinouart, A. (1771). L’art de se taire, principalement en matière de religion. Paris: Petite Bibliothèque Payot.Google Scholar
  3. Dolar, M. (2006). The Voice and Nothing More. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  4. Edwards, R., & Reader, K. (2001). The Papin Sisters. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Fink, B. (1997). The Lacanian Subject: Between Language and Jouissance. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Franke, W. (2007a). On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and the Arts. Volume 1. Classic Formulations. Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
  7. Franke, W. (2007b). On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and the Arts. Volume 2. Modern and Contemporary Transformations. Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
  8. Franke, W. (2014). A Philosophy of the Unsayable. Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
  9. Grigg, R. (1997). The Concept of Semblant in Lacan’s Teaching. Lacan.com. Accessed from http://www.lacan.com/griggblog.html.
  10. Kojève, A. (1949 [1969]). Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit (J. Nichols, Trans.). Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  11. La Rochefoucauld, F. (1959). Maxims. New York: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  12. Lacan, J. (1933 [1988]). Motives of Paranoid Crime: The Crime of the Papin Sisters. Critical Texts, 5, 7–11.Google Scholar
  13. Lacan, J. (1953–1954 [1991]). Seminar I: Freud’s Papers on Technique (J.-A. Miller, Ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Lacan, J. (1959–1960 [1992]). Seminar VII: The Ethics of Psychoanalysis. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  15. Lacan, J. (1961–1962 [2002]). Seminar IX: Identification (C. Gallagher, Trans.). London: Karnac.Google Scholar
  16. Lacan, J. (1962–1963 [2014]). Seminar X: Anxiety (J.-A. Miller, Ed.). Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
  17. Lacan, J. (1966 [2002]). Écrits (B. Fink, Trans.). New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  18. Lacan, J. (1972–1973 [1998]). Seminar XX: Encore—On Feminine Sexuality, the Limits of Love and Knowledge (B. Fink, Trans.). London and New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  19. Milner, J.-C. (1995). L’Œuvre claire, Lacan, la science, la philosophie. Paris: Seuil.Google Scholar
  20. Nasio, J.-D. (1987). Le silence en psychanalyse. Paris: Payot.Google Scholar
  21. Taylor, C. (2016). The Language Animal: The Full Shape of the Human Linguistic Capacity. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Wittgenstein, L. (1922 [1981]). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (C. K. Ogden, Trans.). New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ed Pluth
    • 1
  • Cindy Zeiher
    • 2
  1. 1.California State University, ChicoChicoUSA
  2. 2.University of CanterburyChristchurchNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations