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Embodied Transactions

  • Mara BrechtEmail author
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Part of the Contributions to Hermeneutics book series (CONT HERMEN, volume 7)

Abstract

Like hermeneutical theorists, comparative theologians accentuate subjectivity as an important part of interpretation and understanding, including interpreting revelation in one’s home tradition, as well as the traditions of others. Feminist scholarship offers resources for deepening these accounts of subjectivity by raising critical, interconnected questions about the practical conditions of life that shape subjective experience, the perceived recipient of revelation, and what constitutes revelation itself. This essay adds to the feminist discussion by turning to the work of feminist-pragmatist philosopher Shannon Sullivan, who herself builds on John Dewey. Sullivan argues for a dynamic, circular, and mutually constituting relationship between physical bodies and environments. As humans, our bodies transact with the surrounding world, and we are informed by those exchanges. Though frequently obscured from view, both literally and figuratively, the body is deeply involved in how one interprets and understands. This essay argues that engaging revelation across religious boundaries presents opportunities that go well beyond the theological—creating pathways for disrupting the seemingly stable categories of race and gender.

Keywords

Revelation Feminist hermeneutics Comparative theology Embodiment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of TheologyLoyola University ChicagoChicagoUSA

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