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Displaying Vehicle Driving Mode – Effects on Pedestrian Behavior and Perceived Safety

  • Philip JoistenEmail author
  • Emanuel Alexandi
  • Robin Drews
  • Liane Klassen
  • Patrick Petersohn
  • Alexander Pick
  • Sarah Schwindt
  • Bettina Abendroth
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1026)

Abstract

The type and amount of information pedestrians should receive while interacting with an autonomous vehicle (AV) remains an unsolved challenge. The information about the vehicle driving mode could help pedestrians to develop the right expectations regarding further actions. The aim of this study is to investigate how the information about the vehicle driving mode affects pedestrian crossing behavior and perceived safety. A controlled field experiment using a Wizard-of-Oz approach to simulate a driverless vehicle was conducted. 28 participants experienced a driverless and a human-operated vehicle from the perspective of a pedestrian. The vehicle was equipped with an external human machine interface (eHMI) that displayed the driving mode of the vehicle (driverless vs. human-operated). The results show that the crossing behavior, measured by critical gap acceptance, and the subjective reporting of perceived safety did not differ statistically significantly between the driverless and the human-operated driving condition.

Keywords

Vehicle driving mode Automation status Pedestrian behavior Perceived safety Human machine interface Human machine interaction 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The present study was supported by the project @CITY-AF which receives funding from the German Federal Ministry of Economy and Energy (BMWi).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Joisten
    • 1
    Email author
  • Emanuel Alexandi
    • 1
  • Robin Drews
    • 1
  • Liane Klassen
    • 1
  • Patrick Petersohn
    • 1
  • Alexander Pick
    • 1
  • Sarah Schwindt
    • 1
  • Bettina Abendroth
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Ergonomics and Human FactorsTechnische Universität DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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