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General Introduction

  • Saloua ChattiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Universal Logic book series (SUL)

Abstract

Arabic logic started with the translations of the Aristotelian and Greek texts. These translations were first made in Syria from Greek to Syriac, then Arabic during the Umayyad Empire for some treatises, but the most important amount of translations was made during the Abbasid Empire [Baghdad, 750–1258 AD], starting from the reign of Abu Jaafar al-Manṣūr [754–775 AD], then Hārūn al Rashīd [786–809 AD] and al-Ma’mūn [813–833 AD] who founded an academy devoted to translation called “Beit al-Ḥikma” (literally: “the House of Wisdom”) [830 AD] (see [127], 140).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Human and Social SciencesUniversity of TunisTunisTunisia

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