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Prologue: Community Nutrition Resilience—What and Why

  • Franziska Alesso-Bendisch
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Climate Resilient Societies book series (PSCRS)

Abstract

This chapter conceptualizes community nutrition resilience. It draws on a literature review related to resilience, delineating the term from the related terms “sustainability,” “transformability,” and “adaptability.” It examines resilience in an urban setting and then among communities. Subsequently, it looks at food security and identifies nutrition as a critical component affecting the health, well-being, and opportunities of communities. It pays particular attention to how a changing climate affects food security. It then examines food systems and its constituent parts as the vehicle for delivering community nutrition resilience. Ultimately, it offers a definition of community nutrition resilience.

Keywords

Resilience Urban resilience Community resilience Food security Food system Community nutrition resilience 

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Franziska Alesso-Bendisch
    • 1
  1. 1.Well Life VenturesMiami BeachUSA

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