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Translanguaging Performances in a CLIL Classroom at a Japanese University

  • Keiko TsuchiyaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

After García and Li Wei’s (Translanguaging. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) seminal work, the phenomenon of translanguaging, which is a multilingual practice of plurilingual individuals as integrated linguistic repertoire, has been investigated by a number of researchers, and the theory has been (re)conceptualised in the field of bi/multilingual education. Lin, Wu, and Lemke (forthcoming) recently coined the term translanguaging performances to describe the nature of structuring of translanguaging. This study focuses on the use of translanguaging in a group discussion in a Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) classroom at a Japanese university, where Japanese students and one Saudi student talked both in Japanese and in English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). The focus is placed on the structure of the participants’ translanguaging (the function and the process), particularly where ELF emerges in the context. In the 40-minute discussion, the participants spoke in Japanese most of the time, and ELF was used for less than 10 minutes in total, especially between a Japanese and an Arabic speaker. Based on Gumperz (Discourse Strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982) and Klimpfinger (‘Mind you, sometimes you have to mix’? The role of code-switching in English as a Lingua Franca. Vienna English Working Papers, 16(2), 36–61, 2007), four functions of translanguaging were identified: (1) addressee specification, (2) assertion, (3) clarification and (4) appealing for linguistic assistance. The process of translanguaging was also examined in relation to turn-taking structure, the results showing that the use of response tokens in ELF and metalinguistic comments seem to function as cues for translanguaging. By so doing, the participants exercise their translanguaging performances, simultaneously co-constructing a translanguaging space in the discussion.

Keywords

Translanguaging Translanguaging performances English as a Lingua Franca Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The article is written based on my previously published article, Tsuchiya (2017): ‘co-constructing a translanguaging space: analysing a Japanese/ELF group discussion in a CLIL classroom at university’ in Translation and Translanguaging in Multilingual Contexts, 3(2), 229–253, which was published by John Benjamins Publishing Company, Amsterdam/Philadelphia (https://benjamins.com/catalog/ttmc). I would like to thank the editor, Prof. Sara Laviosa, and the publisher for kindly providing the permission. I also extend my gratitude to the GRAPE (Group for Research on Academic and Professional English) at Universitat Jaume I for offering an excellent webinar programme of translanguaging in CLIL in higher education (http://www.grape.uji.es), which was inspiring. This study was supported in part by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) No. 26870599.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International College of Arts and SciencesYokohama City UniversityYokohamaJapan

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