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Theoretical Underpinnings Needed for the Caribbean

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
  • Camille L. Huggins
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Social Work book series (BRIEFSSOWO)

Abstract

In this chapter, when working in the Caribbean there should be a theoretical framework that best works with vulnerable and disenfranchised populations such as, those living in extreme poverty. The theories should be anti-oppressive and social justice-oriented frameworks such as; resiliency theory, intersectionality, and cultural humility.

Keywords

Anti-oppressive practice Intersectionality Cultural humility 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
    • 1
  • Camille L. Huggins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioural Sciences St. Augustine CampusThe University of the West IndiesSt. AugustineTrinidad and Tobago

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