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Social Problems in the Caribbean

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
  • Camille L. Huggins
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Social Work book series (BRIEFSSOWO)

Abstract

The Caribbean is a collection of developing countries that is the hub of global social problems. These islands of paradise have not been saved from the social ills and problems prevalent in societies at large. This chapter will outline a few of the prevalent social problems in the Caribbean and the importance of utilizing the casework method for these problems. It will also provide an overview of the current social welfare systems in the Caribbean as well as the current education used to train social service workers.

Keywords

Social problems Welfare systems Social welfare education Caribbean 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
    • 1
  • Camille L. Huggins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioural Sciences St. Augustine CampusThe University of the West IndiesSt. AugustineTrinidad and Tobago

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