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Domestic Consumption: Patterns and Comparisons

  • Tim Murray
  • Penny Crook
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

This chapter presents the analysis of roughly contemporaneous cesspit backfills from the Cumberland Gloucester Street site in Sydney and the Commonwealth Block site in Melbourne. The consequences of similarities and differences in core issues such as the integrity and dating of deposits, the vectors of deposition and accumulation and the identities of occupants are explored.

Keywords

Sydney Melbourne Cesspits Urban archaeology and Material culture 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tim Murray
    • 1
  • Penny Crook
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Arts, Social Sciences and CommerceLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Archaeology and HistoryLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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