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(Other)Worldly Goods: Ghost Fiction as Financial Writing in Margaret Oliphant and Charlotte Riddell

  • Victoria MargreeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Margaret Oliphant and Charlotte Riddell are both practitioners of what could be considered the comforting, morally didactic ghost story. The stories of each generally eschew malevolent ghosts in favour of anguished souls in need of earthly assistance, or who themselves seek to protect or otherwise benefit the living. Although their tales sometimes contain significant elements of uncanniness, the tonal emphasis falls not predominantly upon producing shock or horror, but on creating a reassuring sense of a providential ordering to the universe that just occasionally requires some sympathetic interaction between the living and the dead to help it along.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of BrightonBrightonUK

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