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“What Can We Do If They Are Not Getting?”: Perspectives of Teachers on Inclusive Education in a Low-Fee Paying Private English-Medium School

  • Maya KalyanpurEmail author
Chapter
Part of the South Asian Education Policy, Research, and Practice book series (SAEPRP)

Abstract

Focusing on one private, low-fee paying English-medium school in India, which served students from low socioeconomic backgrounds, this study sought to understand teachers’ perspectives on inclusive education and student failure. Data included interviews with six teachers, classroom observations, and student work samples. The study found that the teachers believed they were not responsible for ensuring that students learn. This was illustrated by their largely negative views of their students’ background, minimal engagement with academically struggling students, and a focus on teacher-led instruction emphasizing rote memorization instead of conceptual and linguistic comprehension. Despite efforts toward Education For All, poor students continue to be the most disadvantaged in their access to quality education.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author would like to acknowledge the Fulbright Foundation research fellowship grant that made this study possible.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of San DiegoSan DiegoUSA

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