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Fostering Success in Education: Educational Outcomes of Students in Foster Care in the United States

  • National Working Group on Foster Care and Education
  • Peter J. PecoraEmail author
  • Kirk O’Brien
Chapter
Part of the Children’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research book series (CHIR, volume 22)

Abstract

Supporting educational needs of students in foster care is a fundamental responsibility of child welfare agencies, education agencies, and courts. The systems and all other sectors of the community such as business, housing, health care, voluntary sector and faith-based organisations must work together to improve policies and practices. For more than a decade, momentum has grown at the federal, state and local levels to prioritize the educational needs of students in foster care. Increased data collection and reporting at state and local levels helps evaluate what programs are working and identify where interventions are needed. This Chapter reviews research and promising programs in the U.S. affecting the educational success of children in foster care.

Keywords

Foster care education research programs improving outcomes United States 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • National Working Group on Foster Care and Education
    • 1
  • Peter J. Pecora
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kirk O’Brien
    • 2
  1. 1.RenoUSA
  2. 2.Casey Family ProgramsSeattleUSA

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