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Globalization or Regionalization? Implications of the Reform of Japanese Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century

  • Shangbo Li
Chapter
Part of the International and Development Education book series (INTDE)

Abstract

The twenty-first century for Japanese higher education has witnessed its emersion into the realms of globalization and regionalization. As implied by the 2005 and 2017 MEXT Reports, the governmental aim is to focus on providing financial support through specific projects, encouraging universities to bring to bear their own particular characteristics and strengths to improve their overall efficiency in response to the complex challenges brought by globalization and a declining birthrate, and their social responsibilities to contribute to local economic development, and the revitalization of the country. These initiatives have brought profound changes to Japanese higher education, which has become characterized by being replete with competition and challenge.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shangbo Li
    • 1
  1. 1.University of International Business and EconomicsBeijingChina

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