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The Exploit: Affective Labor and Poetry at the University

  • Catherine Wagner
  • with David Boeving
  • Sylvia Chan
  • Alex Cintron
  • Emily Corwin
  • Rachel Galvin
  • Courtney Kalmbach
  • Jessica Lowenthal
  • Jessica Marshall
  • rob mclennan
  • Ian Schoultz
  • Chelsea Tadeyeske
  • Alison Thompson
  • Amy Toland
  • Rodrigo Toscano
  • Jo Lindsay Walton, and Others
Chapter
Part of the Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Poetics book series (MPCC)

Abstract

The Exploit was a collaborative project about labor in the academy, which was framed as both a “didactic joke” and as a “hack.” Instead of trying to create or model havens for less-alienated thinking, the project aligned creative production with the imperatives that drive the contemporary university: efficient productivity and return on investment. At different stages, it involved an adjunct faculty member, various editors and readers, and the students in Wagner’s graduate poetry workshop. The Exploit leveraged these human resources to increase their productivity. Labor performed for the project was integrated with labor already being performed in the fulfilment of professional duties and the pursuit of educational qualifications. The project overtly and intentionally reproduced existing hierarchies and inequities in order to draw attention to them. This chapter recounts and reflects theoretically on what The Exploit revealed about interlaced circuits of economic, cultural, educational and academic capital.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Wagner
    • 1
  • with David Boeving
  • Sylvia Chan
  • Alex Cintron
  • Emily Corwin
  • Rachel Galvin
  • Courtney Kalmbach
  • Jessica Lowenthal
  • Jessica Marshall
  • rob mclennan
  • Ian Schoultz
  • Chelsea Tadeyeske
  • Alison Thompson
  • Amy Toland
  • Rodrigo Toscano
  • Jo Lindsay Walton, and Others
  1. 1.Miami UniversityOxfordUSA

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