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Vegetable Oil, Biodiesel and Ethanol Alternative Fuels

  • Douglas Byron
Chapter

Abstract

While fire debris analysis is largely focused on petroleum-based ignitable liquids, other liquid fuels such as vegetable oils and alternative fuels may also fall within the scope of analysis of a fire debris examiner. The identification of vegetable oils, which can include cooking oils, stains, and drying oils, is potentially important in the context of fire investigation. Alternative fuels are becoming more common based on changes in fuel standards, which have increased general consumer use of biofuels and ethanol-based fuels. As such, these fuels are increasingly seen in casework.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas Byron
    • 1
  1. 1.Forensic and Scientific Testing, Inc. (FAST Inc.)LawrencevilleUSA

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