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Fungal White Biotechnology: Conclusion and Future Prospects

  • Ajar Nath Yadav
Chapter
Part of the Fungal Biology book series (FUNGBIO)

Abstract

White biotechnology refers to the use of living cells and/or their enzymes to create industrial products that are more easily degradable, require less energy, and create less waste during production. The fungal white biotechnology includes biodiversity of fungi from different habitats, including extreme environments (high temperature, low temperature, salinity, and pH) and associated with plants (epiphytic, endophytic, and rhizospheric) and their industrial applications in diverse sectors. This chapter covered conclusion of all three book content of recent advancement in white biotechnology through fungi. The concluding remark envisioned the future beneficial role of fungi with the use of new biotechnological techniques with potential application in agriculture, industry, food and feed processing, as well as clean environments for future sustainable systems.

Keywords

Fungal biotechnology Fungal enzymes Plant growth promotion Secondary metabolites Value-added products White biotechnology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to the Department of Biotechnology, Akal College of Agriculture, Eternal University, Baru Sahib, and Department of Environment, Science and Technology, Shimla, HP-funded project “Development of microbial consortium as bio-inoculants for drought and low temperature growing crops for organic farming in Himachal Pradesh,” for providing the facilities and financial support to undertake the investigations. There are no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ajar Nath Yadav
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiotechnologyAkal College of Agriculture, Eternal UniversityBaru Sahib, SirmourIndia

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