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Field Conditions, Attitudes and Relations in Practice

  • Nicola Sim
Chapter
Part of the New Directions in Cultural Policy Research book series (NDCPR)

Abstract

This chapter listens to the voices of youth and gallery practitioners to get a feel for their respective sectors’ current concerns and attitudes towards partnership. Practitioners from around the UK also offer perspectives on the sectors’ differing approaches to arts practice, and the sometimes-problematic relationship between galleries and youth organisations. Drawing upon findings generated through four years of engagement with youth sector and gallery education events, the selected accounts and comments indicate distinctive patterns of understanding and behaviour. These patterns provide insight into some of the key reasons behind challenges in youth/arts partnerships.

Keywords

Youth sector Gallery education Partnership 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicola Sim
    • 1
  1. 1.University of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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