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Weight Loss Medications in Adolescents

  • Linda L. Buckley
  • Daniel H. Bessesen
  • Philip S. ZeitlerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Endocrinology book series (COE)

Abstract

A strong association exists between weight gain and the development of metabolic diseases, including hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease, as well as increased mortality rates. It is also clear that weight loss can markedly improve insulin resistance (IR) and other markers of adverse health risks in obese individuals. Currently available treatments include diet, exercise, medications, and surgery. Pharmacotherapy for obesity is a treatment approach that has intermediate effectiveness and risk between behavioral therapy and surgery and has been advocated as a “mainstream” treatment option that should be discussed with patients.

Keywords

Obesity Weight loss Medications Orlistat Phentermine Topiramate GLP-1 agonists 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda L. Buckley
    • 1
  • Daniel H. Bessesen
    • 2
  • Philip S. Zeitler
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Swedish Medical Center, Denver Endocrinology/Diabetes & Thyroid Center PCEnglewoodUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineUniversity of Colorado Denver School of MedicineAuroraUSA
  3. 3.Section of Pediatric EndocrinologyUniversity of Colorado School of Medicine, Children’s Hospital ColoradoAuroraUSA

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