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Learning to Learn: Community Development Training During the 1960s

  • Fernando Purcell
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter approaches volunteers’ training as a means to examine the paradigms of community social intervention that the Peace Corps intended to enact. The chapter discusses how characteristics common among different programs reinforced the distance and cultural asymmetry with South American societies. It then discusses the formative spheres and their functionality in order to analyze the main changes that occurred through the decade. These changes sprang from the combination of interactions within local societies, criticisms lodged by former volunteers, and contributions by different actors who circulated their ideas. The final part of the chapter explains the result of these interactions: the shift toward “in-country training” that moved preparation of the volunteers to inside the host societies.

Keywords

Training Community development Alterity Poverty Asymmetry Culture shock Universities US-centrism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fernando Purcell
    • 1
  1. 1.Pontificia Universidad Católica de ChileSantiagoChile

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