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Lifestyle Changes and Prevention: Unique Issues for Young Women

  • Nathalie Levasseur
  • Rinat Yerushalmi
  • Karen A. GelmonEmail author
Chapter
  • 55 Downloads

Abstract

Preventative research tailored to young women remains an area of unmet need, as women under 40 are often underrepresented in clinical trials. The identification of younger women at high risk of breast cancer also poses a number of challenges, as risk prediction models often fail to account for important biological differences between younger and older women. Notably, genetics, ethnicity, breast density, and reproductive factors are all intrinsically related to an individual’s risk of developing breast cancer. Preventative strategies, including pharmacological prevention, surgical prevention, and lifestyle modifications, should be adapted to address the needs of a younger breast cancer population. This chapter summarizes current knowledge on preventative and lifestyle strategies which are directly applicable to young women and identifies knowledge gaps that may guide future research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathalie Levasseur
    • 1
  • Rinat Yerushalmi
    • 2
  • Karen A. Gelmon
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.BC Cancer AgencyVancouver Cancer CentreVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Davidoff Cancer CenterRabin Medical CenterPetah TikvaIsrael

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