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Introduction

  • Vladimir Lifschitz
Chapter

Abstract

When a programmer solves a computational problem, this is usually accomplished by finding or designing an algorithm and encoding it in an implemented programming language. This book is about an alternative, declarative approach to programming, which does not involve encoding algorithms. A program in a declarative language only describes what is counted as a solution. Given such a description, a declarative programming system finds a solution by the process of automated reasoning. A program in a declarative language is an encoding of the problem itself, not of an algorithm.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir Lifschitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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