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“To Speak Against an Opponent Eloquently Makes You an Unusual Personage”: Joss Whedon as Deleuzian “Minor Writer”

  • Michael StarrEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter positions Joss Whedon via the concept of the “Minor Writer,” as developed by poststructuralist philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. In these terms, “minor” is not simply defined as a literature written from the perspective of an oppressed group, nor a secondary or neglected writing; instead, minor writing takes the language of the dominant culture and warps it to new purposes, thus creating “lines of flight” in terms of creative new trajectories that depart from dominant identities, inventing new forms of collective life, consciousness and affectivity. Such a reading, demonstrated via specific examples drawn from Whedonverse texts, facilitates the interrogation of issues pertaining to politics, fandom, transmedia, feminism and social activism, as well the negotiation of problematic issues concerning Whedon’s status as a cult auteur despite his recent absorption into the Hollywood mainstream.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of NorthamptonNorthamptonUK

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