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Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis

  • Michael J. Bradshaw
  • Michael F. Holick
  • James M. Stankiewicz
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Neurology book series (CCNEU)

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Much has been learned about the role of vitamin D in MS, although our understanding remains incomplete. While the precise etiology of MS remains incompletely understood, low vitamin D status is one factor that appears to predispose to the development of MS, and patients with low 25(OH)D levels may be at greater risk of disease activity. Clinical trials are currently underway to more directly address the role of vitamin D supplementation in MS, yet further investigations are needed. This chapter reviews the role of vitamin D in the pathophysiology of MS and the evidence related to clinical outcomes in patients with MS who have vitamin D deficiency.

Keywords

Multiple sclerosis Vitamin D Cholecalciferol Ergocalciferol Deficiency Sunlight Optic neuritis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Bradshaw
    • 1
  • Michael F. Holick
    • 2
  • James M. Stankiewicz
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Chicago Medical SchoolRosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, Billings ClinicBillingsUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineBoston University Medical CenterBostonUSA
  3. 3.Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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