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International Water Cooperation in Europe: Lessons for the Nile Basin Countries?

  • Götz Reichert
Chapter
Part of the Ethiopian Yearbook of International Law book series (EtYIL, volume 2018)

Abstract

The construction of the “Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam” (GERD) could be a catalyst for a general paradigm shift in relations between the countries of the Nile basin. Changing power constellations between upstream and downstream riparians not only challenge long-standing claims to the river’s water resources, but also offer the opportunity to establish a truly basin-wide legal framework for the resolution of water disputes or even for the common management of the Nile for the mutual benefit of all riparians. In this respect, contemporary international water law offers valuable guidance for the development of substantive and procedural rules. Furthermore, experiences made in transboundary river basins in other regions of the world could provide inspiration to Nile riparians to devise their own solutions tailored to their specific needs. To this end, this article explores efforts made by riparians in European river basins—failures and successes alike—to solve their water-related conflicts. On this basis, it is suggested that some essential “lessons learned” in Europe are useful for fostering international water cooperation between the riparian countries of the Nile basin.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Götz Reichert
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for European PolicyFreiburgGermany

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