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Regulatory Guidelines for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contamination

  • Saranya Kuppusamy
  • Naga Raju Maddela
  • Mallavarapu Megharaj
  • Kadiyala Venkateswarlu
Chapter

Abstract

The contamination of land with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) is a serious environmental and development issue in many nations. If managed well, it can be an opportunity for urban renewal and development. However, if not managed or remediated, it can pose deleterious effects on public health and the environment. Fortunately, industrialized nations such as the USA, the UK, Canada, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and Australia have developed comprehensive and proven regulatory frameworks for TPHs site management. However, developing countries lack regulations for TPHs. This chapter presents an overview of the TPHs contamination management in both developed and developing countries and identifies the gaps in existing policy and regulations. Finally, we provide a series of recommendations that could enhance TPHs-contaminated land legislation, especially in the developing countries.

Keywords

TPHs-contaminated sites Environmental protection Improved regulatory regimes Remediation guidelines for TPHs 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Environmental StudiesAnna UniversityChennaiIndia
  2. 2.Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud y Departamento de investigaciónUniversidad Técnica de ManabíPortoviejoEcuador
  3. 3.Global Centre for Environmental RemediationThe University of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia
  4. 4.NelloreIndia

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