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Debating the Nation: Dealing with Difference and Incommensurability

  • Catherine Koerner
  • Soma PillayEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is to examine social construction of a contemporary nation. This will first allow us to comment on the racialised discourse that produces a white Australia and second further contextualise the question ‘How do rural people who identify as white Australian think about race and Australian identity in the context of Indigenous sovereignty in their everyday lives?’ Part of the answer to this question requires an exploration of the social construction of the nation. This chapter argues that there is a simultaneous history of the oppression of Indigenous Australians and Oriental others through racialisation.

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Federation University AustraliaMelbourneAustralia

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