Advertisement

Hubris of Transcendental Idealism

  • Martin Ritter
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 104)

Abstract

Patočka’s phenomenology, as presented in The Natural World as a Philosophical Problem, creatively transforms Husserl’s concept of Lebenswelt. The chapter demonstrates the originality of Patočka’s approach. I summarize Patočka’s analysis of the natural world to focus on the concept of transcendental subjectivity. How can this subjectivity be achieved by a finite consciousness and, even more importantly, what is this subjectivity? Elaborating on Husserl’s transcendental idealism, Patočka identifies the concrete concept of constituting subjectivity with that of “monads” intermeshing with one another. I suggest interpreting this concept as pointing to trans-individual process of life embodied by the monads ontologically grounding the world.

Keywords

Edmund Husserl Freedom Intersubjective constitution Jan Patočka Lifeworld Phenomenology of life Transcendental idealism Transcendental reflection 

References

  1. Adorno, Theodor. 2008. Lectures on Negative Dialectics. Cambridge, MA: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  2. Hagedorn, Ludger. 2015. “Quicquid Cogitat.” On the Uses and Disadvantages of Subjectivity. In The Phenomenological Critique of Mathematisation and the Question of Responsibility, ed. Ľubica Učník, Ivan Chvatík, and Anita Williams, 89–104. Cham: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Husserl, Edmund. 1970. The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology. Trans. David Carr. Evanston: Northwestern University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Karfík, Filip. 2008. Unendlichwerden durch die Endlichkeit. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.Google Scholar
  5. Lehmann, Sandra. 2004. Der Horizont der Freiheit: zum Existenzdenken Jan Patočkas. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.Google Scholar
  6. Mensch, James. 2016. Patočka’s Asubjective Phenomenology: Toward a New Concept of Human Rights. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.Google Scholar
  7. Moran, Dermot. 2015. Everydayness, Historicity and the World of Science: Husserl’s Life-World Reconsidered. In The Phenomenological Critique of Mathematisation and the Question of Responsibility, 107–131. Springer.Google Scholar
  8. Novotný, Karel. 1999. Erscheinung des Ganzen. Patočkas phänomenologische Philosophie der dreissiger Jahre bezüglich seines Spätwerks. In Jan Patočka: Texte, Dokumente, Bibliographie, ed. Ludger Hagedorn and Hans Reiner Sepp, 137–169. München/Prag: Verlag K. Alber/Oikúmené.Google Scholar
  9. Patočka, Jan. 1989. The “Natural” World and Phenomenology. In Philosophy and Selected Writings, ed. Erazim Kohák, 239–273. Chicago: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
  10. ———. 1999. Erinnerungen an Edmund Husserl. In Patočka: Texte, Dokumente, Bibliographie, ed. Ludger Hagedorn and Hans Reiner Sepp. München/Prag: Verlag K. Alber/Oikúmené.Google Scholar
  11. ———. 2008a. Pojem evidence a jeho význam pro noetiku. In Fenomenologické spisy I, ed. Ivan Chvatík and Jan Frei, 14–125. Praha: Oikúmené.Google Scholar
  12. ———. 2008b. Přirozený svět jako filosofický problém. In Fenomenologické spisy I, ed. Ivan Chvatík and Jan Frei, 127–259. Praha: Oikúmené.Google Scholar
  13. ———. 2016. The Natural World as a Philosophical Problem. In The Natural World as a Philosophical Problem. Trans. Erika Abrams, 1–114. Evanston: Northwestern University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Petříček, Miroslav. 1991. Jan Patočka et l’idée du monde naturel. In Les Cahiers de Philosophie, 11–12 (1990–1991), 117–152. Lille.Google Scholar
  15. Rorty, Richard. 2009. Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Ritter
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PhilosophyCzech Academy of SciencesPragueCzech Republic

Personalised recommendations