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Sexual Assault and Female Gang Involvement: A Look at Risk Amplification and Prevention

  • Aubri F. McDonald
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the relationship between child sexual abuse (CSA) and female gang involvement. Young women who have been sexually abused at home often run away to escape the abuse and seek refuge in a gang where they are vulnerable to being sexually victimized by males in the gang. An overview of theoretical perspectives offers social, economic, and personal contexts that influence females to participate in gangs. A prevention plan is presented that identifies risk and protective factors for gang involvement at different levels of the social ecology. The plan is tailored to address the effects of CSA as an underlying risk factor for female gang involvement and an amplifying risk factor for sexual revictimization.

Keywords

Female gangs CSA Sexual assault Revictimization Gang prevention 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Aubri F. McDonald
    • 1
  1. 1.Criminal Justice DepartmentUniversity of Wisconsin-ParksideKenoshaUSA

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