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Paths to Resilience: Examining EU and NATO Responses to the Tunisian and Egyptian Political Transitions

  • Maria Giulia Amadio Viceré
  • Andrea Frontini
Chapter

Abstract

The unfolding of the Arab uprisings has shown that fostering the ability of countries affected by regime change to withstand crises is necessary for the EU and NATO to ensure the stability of the broader Southern Mediterranean region. The political transitions in Egypt and Tunisia arose from pressures to democratise. Yet, as the region’s security environment was deteriorating, EU and NATO have mostly addressed the symptoms of local instability, but largely neglected the long-term causes of insecurity in the two countries. By doing so, Euro-Atlantic diplomacy essentially enhanced state resilience at the expense of the broader societal resilience. In perspective, further political and operational coordination between NATO and the EU is needed to avoid risks of duplications and/or inconsistencies in their regional action.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Giulia Amadio Viceré
    • 1
  • Andrea Frontini
    • 2
  1. 1.LUISS UniversityRomeItaly
  2. 2.Formerly European Policy CentreTriesteItaly

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