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A Transcultural Model of Attachment and Its Vicissitudes: Interventions Based on Mentalization in Chile

  • Felipe Lecannelier
Chapter

Abstract

After a brief discussion on cultural issues relevant to the attachment literature, the chapter focuses on an educational and interventional program which is being implemented in Chile. This is presented as an example of a program attempting to promote the mental health of young children by promoting strategies to alleviate difficult live experiences. These include children in orphanages. In Chile as in most countries, foster care is rarely employed to raise children whose parents are unable to do so. The conditions in orphanages although physically adequate, often do not take into account the emotional needs of young children. Other programs that we have implemented and will be described in this chapter occur in child care settings. The national model to promote secure attachment includes mentalization-based techniques taught to caregivers and parents to appreciate the mental states and attachment needs of young children, and the impact on caregivers of infant and young child behaviors. This can be called self-mentalization. These skills are taught to caregivers in small groups and promote increased emotional sensitivity in caregivers, who appreciate the importance of their own mental states when dealing with children, and to become more aware of the meaning of distress behavior in infants and preschoolers.

Keywords

Attachment Mentalization Mentalization-based interventions Parental sensitivity Insecure attachment Disorganized attachment Complex trauma Orphanages Imprisoned mothers Attachment in child care Multiple caregivers 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Felipe Lecannelier
    • 1
  1. 1.Facultad de Ciencias MedicasUniversidad de Santiago de ChileSantiagoChile

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