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Results: Speech Acts in Children’s Books

  • Gila A. Schauer
Chapter
Part of the English Language Education book series (ELED, volume 18)

Abstract

In this chapter, I will first examine the total number of the different speech acts contained in the 22 children’s books that I investigated. This will be followed by an analysis and discussion of the individual speech acts examined. I will begin with requests and responses to requests and will then address greetings and leave-takings. This will be followed by an analysis of expressions of gratitude, apologies, suggestions, and expressions of physical and mental states. I will then provide a summary of this chapter.

In order to show in-service or pre-service teachers what speech act input the picturebooks may add to the speech act input provided in the textbooks, I will begin each section which focuses on a particular speech act with a quick reminder of the textbooks’ results from Chap.  4 for the same speech act. This will enable readers primarily interested in the picturebooks results to see how useful (or not) individual picturebooks are with regard to providing additional pragmatic input on specific speech acts without having to constantly consult Chap.  4 in order to compare the findings.

Keywords

Pragmatics Speech acts Materials for young learners Authentic materials EFL TEYL TEFL 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gila A. Schauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of LinguisticsUniversity of ErfurtErfurtGermany

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