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Post-socialist Hauntings in Vietnamese Revisionist Cinema

  • Thong Win
Chapter

Abstract

Thong Win discusses two films of celebrated filmmaker Đặng Nhật Minh—When the 10th Month Comes (1984) and Don’t Burn (2009) in his chapter. Win contextualizes the political history of the Vietnamese film industry for the readers before tackling the important role of the ghosts in these two revisionist films. He argues that by using spirits, Đặng’s critiques failed socialist promises in addition to the tendency to romanticize the sacrifices of war as well as postwar Vietnamese society. According to Win, the ghosts work to reflect the differences in the way the Vietnamese Communist Party (VCP) memorializes war and how survivors remember it. In this way, Đặng’s films resist State hegemony, at times and in various ways, but also provide alternative narratives of war.

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Films

  1. Don’t Burn. Directed by Đặng Nhật Minh. Vietnam, 2009.Google Scholar
  2. When the Tenth Month Comes. Directed by Đặng Nhật Minh. Vietnam, 1984.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thong Win
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA

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