Advertisement

Where Do We Go from Here? Comments from the Research Team: How Can You Apply What We Learned to Your Own After-School Reading Program?

  • Elaine Clanton Harpine
  • Keri Weed
  • Sarah Stevens
  • William D. Harpine
  • Bridget Coleman
  • Thomas Reid
  • Shana Ingram
  • Anna Thompson
  • Collytte Cederstrom
  • Kayla Hamilton
Chapter

Abstract

How can we improve reading instruction nationwide? The methods that work to teach children to read are well understood. Since the political and economic pressures on schools are so great, it seems unlikely that schools will change. After-school community programs are most likely the answer to helping children learn to read. There is no limit to what we can accomplish if we put disproven, wrong ideas aside and work for the best interests of children. This chapter gives five steps that can lead to success.

The Reading Orienteering Club was many years in development, and has helped many children learn to read. Working with a small budget and the help of many dedicated volunteers, this program reached out to the community to help children. The schools and, sometimes, the parents had given up all hope, yet even children who had made no progress after years in school learned to read in the Reading Orienteering Club.

Keywords

Service-learning Group-centered prevention Reading failure At-risk students Intrinsic motivation Efficacy retraining Phonemic awareness Academic failure violence prevention Program evaluation Implementation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

  1. 1.

    Special appreciation to Keri Weed, Ph.D. and Sarah Stevens, Ph.D., University of South Carolina Aiken, for allowing their students to work on the project.

     
  2. 2.

    A special thank-you to St. John’s United Methodist Church in Aiken for providing community volunteers, and financial sponsorship, while allowing us to use classroom space for this project.

     
  3. 3.

    At the time of research, Keri Weed, Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina Aiken; Sarah Stevens, Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina Aiken.

     
  4. 4.

    Study presented in Elaine Clanton Harpine (Chair), Organizing community-based prevention programs in at-risk communities: University-community partnerships. (Clanton Harpine, 2010). Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, San Diego, CA.

     
  5. 5.

    Elaine Clanton Harpine, Ph.D., was the director of the Camp Sharigan Project for 8 years. She developed the Camp Sharigan and Reading Orienteering Club programs and created the program packets for both programs.

     

References

  1. Clanton Harpine, E. (2007). Applying motivation theory to real-world problems. Teaching of Psychology, 34, 111–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Clanton Harpine, E. (2010). Erasing failure in the classroom, vol. 2: Vowel clustering, a ready-to-use classroom style group-centered intervention for teaching irregular vowel sounds to at-risk children and youth. North Augusta, SC: Group-Centered Learning.Google Scholar
  3. Clanton Harpine, E. (2015). Group-centered prevention in mental health: Theory, training, and practice. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Clanton Harpine, E. (2017). Erasing Failure in the Classroom Series, Vol. 3: The Reading Orienteering Club, 4-Step Method for Teaching Children to Read, After-School Program (2nd ed.). North Augusta, SC: Group-Centered Learning.Google Scholar
  5. Clanton Harpine, E., & Reid, T. (2009). Enhancing academic achievement in a Hispanic immigrant community: The role of Reading in academic failure and mental health. School Mental Health, 1, 159–170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cross, A. B., Gottfredson, D. C., Wilson, D. M., Rorie, M., & Connell, N. (2010). Implementation quality and positive experiences in after-school programs. American Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 370–380.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9295-zCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Durlak, J. A., & Dupre, E. P. (2008). Implementation matters: A review of research on the influence of implementation on program outcomes and the factors affecting implementation. American Journal of Community Psychology, 41, 327–350.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-008-9165-0CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Hirsch, J., Mekinda, M. A., & Stawicki, J. (2010). More than attendance: The importance of after-school program quality. American Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 447–452.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9310-4CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Kazdin, A. E. (2008). Evidence-based treatment and practice: New opportunities to bridge clinical research and practice, enhance the knowledge base, and improve patient care. American Psychologist, 63, 146–159.  https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.63.3.146CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Kratochwill, T. R. (2007). Preparing psychologists for evidence-based school practice: Lessons learned and challenges ahead. American Psychologist, 62, 826–843.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Langley, A. K., Nadeem, E., Kataoka, S. H., Stein, B. D., & Jaycox, L. H. (2010). Evidence-based mental health programs in schools: Barriers and facilitators of successful implementation. School Mental Health, 2, 105–113.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s12310-010-9038-1CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  12. Lundy, B. L. (2007). Service learning and life-span developmental psychology: Higher exam scores and increased empathy. Teaching of Psychology, 34, 23–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. McHugh, R. K., & Barlow, D. H. (2010). The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments: A review of current efforts. American Psychologist, 65, 73–84.  https://doi.org/10.1037/a0018121CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Nduna, N. J. (2007). The community voice on service-learning: A good practice guide for higher education. Education as Change, 11(3), 69–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Pierce, K. M., Bolt, D. M., & Vandell, D. L. (2010). Specific features of after-school program quality: Associations with Children’s functioning in middle childhood. American Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 381–393.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9304-2CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  16. Riggs, N. R., Bohnert, A. M., Guzman, M. D., & Davidson, D. (2010). Examining the potential of community-based after-school programs for Latino youth. American Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 417–429.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9313-1CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Roth, J. L., Malone, L. M., & Brooks-Gunn, J. (2010). Does the amount of participation in afterschool programs relate to developmental outcomes? A review of the literature. American Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 310–324.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9303-3CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Shaywitz, S. (2003). Overcoming dyslexia: A new and complete science-based program for reading problems at any level. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  19. Sheldon, J., Arbreton, A., Hopkins, L., & Grossman, J. B. (2010). Investing in success: Key strategies for building quality in after-school programs. American Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 394–404.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9296-yCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Shernoff, D. J. (2010). Engagement in after-school programs as a predictor of social competence and academic performance. American Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 325–337.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9314-0CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Strage, A. A. (2000). Service-learning: Enhancing student learning outcomes in a college-level lecture course. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 12, 5–13.Google Scholar
  22. Thompson, M. C. (2000). Word will end the word (Vol. 1, 2nd ed.). New York: Royal Fireworks Press.Google Scholar
  23. Weiss, H. B., Little, P. M. D., & Bouffard, S. M. (2005). More than just being there: Balancing the participation equation. New Directions for Youth Development, 2005(105), 15–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elaine Clanton Harpine
    • 1
  • Keri Weed
    • 1
  • Sarah Stevens
    • 1
  • William D. Harpine
    • 1
  • Bridget Coleman
    • 1
  • Thomas Reid
    • 1
  • Shana Ingram
    • 1
  • Anna Thompson
    • 1
  • Collytte Cederstrom
    • 1
  • Kayla Hamilton
    • 1
  1. 1.University of South Carolina AikenAikenUSA

Personalised recommendations